Guzheng (pinyin: Gǔ Zhēng), also known as Hanzheng and Qinzheng, is an ancient national musical instrument of the Han nationality and is popular all over China. It is often used for solo, duet, instrumental ensemble and accompaniment of song and dance, opera and folk art. Because of its wide range, beautiful timbre, rich playing skills and strong expressiveness, it is known as the "King of Music", also known as "Oriental Piano", and is one of the unique and important national musical instruments in China.
Guqin (pinyin: Gǔ Qín) is a traditional Chinese musical instrument with a history of at least 3,500 years. Guqin is also known as Yaoqin, Yuqin and Seven-stringed Qin. The guqin has 13 emblems that mark the rhythm, and is also a ritual and musical instrument. It belongs to the silk in the octave. Guqin has a wide range, deep timbre and long aftertone.
Zhongruan (pinyin: zhōng ruǎn) is a national plucked musical instrument with a long history in China. It is a traditional plucked musical instrument of the Chinese nation. Because of the mellow, rich tone and wide range of sound, Ruan has become the main instrument in solo, ensemble, and duet in ancient times; in modern times, Ruan can play a powerful role in the orchestra, and Da Ruan and Zhong Ruan are mainly used in national orchestras.
Banhu (pinyin: bǎn hú) is a kind of stringed instrument with a history of more than 300 years in China. The timbre is high, firm, and has strong penetrating power. It is the main accompaniment instrument for northern opera and rap.
Matouqin (pinyin: mǎ tóu qín) is a two-stringed stringed musical instrument with a trapezoidal body and a handle carved into the shape of a horse's head. A sort of.
Yangqin (Pinyin: YangQin) was introduced from Persia at the end of the Ming Dynasty. It was originally used as an accompaniment for folk art and formed a variety of genres. After nearly 400 years of circulation and evolution in my country, dulcimer has traditional Chinese characteristics and national styles in musical instrument production, performance art or music creation, and combined with local folk music, it has formed a number of outstanding A genre with local and musical characteristics.
Erhu (Pinyin: Erhu) originated in the Tang Dynasty, called "Xiqin", and has a history of more than a thousand years. It is a traditional Chinese stringed instrument. Erhu, or Erxian Huqin, also known as "Nanhu" and "Omzi", is one of the main bowed and stringed instruments (wiping strings) in the Chinese national musical instrument family.
Yueqin (Pinyin: yuè qín), a plucked musical instrument of the Han nationality, originated in the Han Dynasty. It has been spread in China, Japan, the Korean Peninsula, and Vietnam. It is also spread in China and Vietnam. The early Yueqin had a long neck and generally had about twelve frets. In the Qing Dynasty, the short-necked Yueqin with the eighth rank or so appeared, which is easy to play in the high-pitched area, and is often used for the accompaniment of opera. After the development and improvement of Ruan in the 1950s, Yueqin usually refers to the short-necked Yueqin in mainland China.
Liuqin (pinyin: Liǔ Qín) is a plucked stringed instrument originated in the Qing Dynasty. The earliest Liuqin has a very simple structure and a very folk-like appearance. Now popular all over the country. It is one of the pear-shaped speakers and stringed instruments that have been circulating among the people since the Tang Dynasty. Its shape, structure and playing method are similar to those of the pipa.
Ruan (Ruan Xian) (Pinyin: Ruǎn), short for Ruan Xian. It is a traditional plucked musical instrument of the Han nationality, also known as Ruan Xian and Ruan Qin. In ancient times, it was called Qin Pipa. Later, because of the introduction of Quxiang Pipa, the name "Pipa" was occupied, and it was named after Ruan Xian, who was good at playing this instrument.
Pipa (pinyin: pí pa), the first plucked instrument, is a traditional plucked instrument in East Asia, a plucked stringed musical instrument. Made of wood or bamboo, the speaker is half-pear-shaped and has four strings on the top. It was originally made of silk thread, but now it is mostly made of steel wire, steel rope and nylon.
Zhu (pinyin: Zhù) is the earliest percussion instrument in China. It was widely popular from the Warring States Period to the Sui and Tang Dynasties, and was lost after the Song Dynasty. Building in the Warring States period has been widely popular.
Tianqin (pinyin: tiān qín) is a plucked stringed musical instrument used by the Zhuang people (Bubian and Budai branch). It is popular in Dongzhong, Ningming and Longzhou on the Sino-Vietnamese border in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region.
Se (pinyin: sè), a traditional plucked stringed instrument, is similar in shape to a zheng but slightly wider. Tuned according to the pentatonic mode, it is often used as an accompaniment instrument for the qin, and is often called the qinse together with the guqin. Se has an important position in Chinese culture and is often referred to as the guqin.
Huobusi (pinyin: huǒ bù sī) is a Mongolian plucked musical instrument. It was found in the Yuan Dynasty and was popular in the Ming Dynasty. It was included in the national music in the Qing Dynasty. It is spread in Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, northern Gansu and Lijiang Naxi Autonomous County in Yunnan Province.
Gehu (pinyin: gé hú) is a low-pitched stringed instrument with a louder volume and a wider range. In the 1950s, Yang Yusen (1926-1980) of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music created it on the basis of the erhu and absorbed the characteristics of other stringed instruments, so it is called Gehu. After continuous improvement, it has now become a bass-pulled string instrument with rich expressiveness.
Leiqin(Pinyin: Léi qín), also known as "Leihu", is a traditional stringed instrument. It is a musical instrument that only appeared in the 1920s.
It is the abbreviation of "Treble Erhu". Its shape, structure, bowing technique, and playing symbols used are the same as those of Erhu, except that the qin barrel (resonance box) is slightly smaller than that of erhu, and part of the qin barrel is usually sandwiched between two legs. play.
Genka (pinyin: gēn kǎ) is a Tibetan bow and stringed musical instrument. Popular in Lhasa, Shigatse and other places in the Tibet Autonomous Region.
Xuanqin (pinyin: xuán qín), also known as Xuanheqin, is a plucked stringed musical instrument played by the Goguryeo people of the ancient Northeast China minority. It has a long history and unique shape. It was popular in Jilin, Liaoning and other regions. Play with a plectrum.
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